South: The Endurance Expedition (Penguin Classics)

South: The Endurance Expedition (Penguin Classics)

Jan 27, Pages. As war clouds darkened over Europe in , a party led by Shackleton set out to make the first crossing of the entire Antarctic continent via the Pole. But their initial optimism was short-lived as ice floes closed around their ship, gradually crushing it and marooning 28 men on the polar ice. And as the story of their journey across treacherous seas and a wilderness of glaciers and snow fields unfolds, the scale of their courage and heroism becomes movingly clear.

Sir Ernest Shackleton, C. Into the Weddell Sea II. Loss of the Endurance V. Escape from the Ice IX. Corners bumped; light shelfwear to the spine ends. Nickel-sized stain to the frontis. Previous owner's small, neat gift inscription on the fly leaf, contents otherwise clean and unmarked. Large map with a single 2-inch closed snag near the gutter. An above average copy of this Antarctic expedition classic. Light rubbing to corners, top hinge a little weak, but still firm, spine slighly frayed, faint vertical crease to spine, ink name and address to front pastedown, normal aging; a very good copy.

This copy is the first American edition, published a year after the very rare first English edition. Almost from the start, Shackleton's last expedition was beset with challenges. The outbreak of WWI, and the loss of financial help made for a very interesting start. To raise the money, Shackleton approached the usual suspects, including the British Government and the Royal Geographical Society, but most of the public schools in England and Scotland contributed too.

Since Amundsen had already conquered the South Pole, Shackleton felt an expedition that would cross the mile Antarctic continent would have great historical and scientific value. So, in October , Shackleton and his crew set out on the Endurance.

Unfortunately, it proved to be a very tough winter, and the Endurance ended up being crushed by the ice. He and his crew were standed on Elephant Island. Along the way their captain fell through the ice, some of the crew were stalked by killer whales, and supplies started to run out. Shackleton decided to get help by taking a small boat across miles of treacherous seas to South Georgia.

Despite a very dangerous voyage, Shackleton succeeded, and all his men were rescued. The book contains some very interesting photographs of this incredible journey. Bound in publisher's blue cloth, with silver ship on front. Fold out map at rear. Good binding and cover. Foxing to page ends, some foxing to margins. Shackleton Memorial Fund 4 page booklet included in rear.

  • South: The Story of Shackleton's Last Expedition by Ernest Shackleton.
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Very Good-, no dust jacket. Cloth worn and starting to fray at the spine ends and corners; soft crease down the spine cloth; single small dent to the rear board. Previous owner's bookplate on the front pastedown. Bright and unmarked contents. A few gutters have been expertly strengthened. There is a single 1-inch snag to the left side of the fold-out map, as well as 2 other shallow snags along the edges. Overall, a sound, clean copy of this classic tale of Shackleton's Antarctic trip. Book has slightly bumped and worn corners, wear to head and heel on the spine, light foxing thus near very good.

The illustration list suggests that the single page plate on page and is missing. And everyone is very cold. This book is mostly Shackleton reconstructing events from his own logs, and, for the parts where he wasn't there, fromt he journals of his crewmates. He never boasts or makes any of the bravery he exhibited seem like it's anything more than the least he could have done in the circumstances. His telling is, for the most part, calm, detailed and almost scientific in it's rigor with frequent mentions of exact longitudes and latitudes, weather specifics, animal species sited and ice conditions , but here and there he'll relate long hours of contemplation where he ponders the best thing to do for the men.

His decisions are always made for their welfare and, at least as he tells it, favoritism or self-interest never enter into the equation. Despite preposterous odds and the most treacherous of circumstances, he managed to return the entire crew of the Endurance to safety with only a touch of frostbite, after 3 years cut off from the world in Antarctica.

The Endurance Expedition

And they all, according to the diaries Sir Ernest excerpts in his own book, kept relatively cheery and grateful for him the whole time. I'm not one of those "leadership" people, who raves on about leadership, in the business sense. Yeah, sure, it's important to have someone competent and inspiring and visionary making big decisions and guiding the works, but I'm not going around yapping about it all the time and pillaging the "leadership and management" section at the bookstore.

But I do think this book said something big to me about leadership — about the importance of keeping your cool no pun intended and being at once in the trenches doing the dirty work along with everyone else and also able to step back and see the big picture and make the hard decisions. And that people can band together and remain positive in the absolute suckiest of circumstances with the right role models Many of the men who Shackleton saved from the horrors of ice, the polar seas in rowboats and foodlessness came back to get promptly mowed down in the trenches of Europe. Frank Hurley, the photographer on the Endurance made some of the most amazing photographs and movie reels in the history of photography and the fact that they got back to civilization in tact is unbelievable — fragile glass plates and such.

He was one of the first people to experiment with early color photographs. They're extremely beautiful and it's quite haunting, really, to see these men, in , in color, in the ice. Edwardian color photography has become a new obsession of mine, really In summary, it's a dry read, to be sure, but fascinating, nonetheless. Extremely interesting and riveting in places even knowing how it all turned out. May 28, Yorkshiresoul rated it it was amazing.

Back when men were men. At the outbreak of WWI Shackleton had outfitted two ships and crews to try a continental crossing of the Antarctic. He offered to halt the expedition but was ordered to continue by Winston Churchill. Famously, the crossing never took place. What did happen was an increasingly desperate fight to survive by the two ship's crews on opposite sides of the polar continent. The book is largely made up of extracts from Shackleton's own diary and the diaries of some of the other ex Back when men were men.

The book is largely made up of extracts from Shackleton's own diary and the diaries of some of the other expedition members, worked together into a strongly coherent narrative. Shackleton charts the problems faced by his the Weddell Sea side of the expedition. His ship, the Endurance, became stuck in sea ice in January where it drifted slowly across the Weddell Sea until it was crushed and sank in November of the same year. Shackleton's crew camped on the moving ice until April of when their ice floe broke apart and they were forced into the salvaged ship's boats to make a harrowing five day sea voyage to the dry land of Elephant Island.

Shackleton exhibits huge compassion for the suffering of his men.

South: The Endurance Expedition: Popular Penguins

The rationing, the constant extreme cold and atrocious weather, the poor rations including periods where the men were doing the backbreaking work of hauling sledges, after the deaths of the dogs, on rations of a single biscuit and a mug of cocoa a day , frostbite, boredom, ennui, scurvy, snow-blindness, exhaustion - the range of problems thrown against the men seems almost insurmountable, and yet, through it all, Shackleton keeps his group together working hard for each other's survival.

Parts of the tale are so epically British that you can't help but feel a swell of pride for a nation that produced men like these. When everything seemed almost lost at the Elephant Island camp, with some of the men finally submitting to the throes of depression, Shackleton and a volunteer crew launched the ship's boat, the James Caird, a vessel slightly larger than a sailing dinghy and sailed miles to South Georgia, arriving there due to the excellent navigational skills of the Endurance's captain Frank Worsely. This voyage alone, through freezing, storm swept, mountainous souther ocean, would be enough for a heroic survival story, and upon landing on the wrong side of South Georgia the men still have to make a long and dangerous march in order to reach the whaling station and raise help.

The conditions faced by the crew of the Aurora across the continent in the Ross Sea were no less incredible. The crew here followed in the tracks of Captain Scott, laying food and fuel depots for Shackleton's party to find as they crossed the continent. The Aurora was ripped from its moorings and drifted, badly damaged, until the crew nursed it to New Zealand. As Shackleton was organising the rescue for the Elephant Island team, so the Aurora's crew organised a rescue for their comrades on the ice near Ross Island.

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South is a tremendous tale of survival against the odds, of what people can do when faced with extremis, when lying down and giving up would have been far easier than struggling on, for day after day, month after month. It is an inspiring read, uplifting in its own way, and illuminates well how these men were the products of the era they lived in - after being rescued every man fit to serve signed up for military service in WWI.

South is currently available for free download from Amazon. Having read Endurance last month, I so appreciated Mallory's recommendation to follow up with Shackleton's own account! I'm glad I read them in this order, as the former read more as a novel, giving a better description of the cast of characters and was organized in a more dramatic fashion. Shackleton, on the other hand, preferred to give away the ending! This first hand account was absolutely enchanting. His descriptions of the phenomena and experiences in the Antarctic were vivid, and the pers Having read Endurance last month, I so appreciated Mallory's recommendation to follow up with Shackleton's own account!

His descriptions of the phenomena and experiences in the Antarctic were vivid, and the personal insights into their unlikely survival were inspiring. I especially enjoyed the scientific reports in the appendices! I highly recommend this as a follow up to Endurance. I had a really hard time getting into the "floe" of this book. See what I did there? No, seriously, Shackleton's writing is very clinical and matter of fact. Recording every day, watching the ice, food stores, lat and long, temperature With no drama or embellishment, which as an avid reader, I love.

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Shackleton exhibits huge compassion for the suffering of his men. The more intriguing passages are the entrees that hint of uncertainty. You may find that you want to skim over some of the more "scientific" stuff and just get to the good parts! Language in this book is beautiful and flows naturally, what makes it a fairly easy and quick read. Large map with a single 2-inch closed snag near the gutter. Book has slightly bumped and worn corners, wear to head and heel on the spine, light foxing thus near very good. Frank Hurley, the photographer on the Endurance made some of the most amazing photographs and movie reels in the history of photography and the fact that they got back to civilization in tact is unbelievable — fragile glass plates and such.

However, this book at its start was dry. That is the truth. You know what else is the truth? You can know that going in, and I had a really hard time getting into the "floe" of this book. You can know that going in, and think, huh, people going to the south pole in That is until you actually read it.

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Editorial Reviews. dev3.statics.snapp.ir Review. Soon after the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole in , his Anglo-Irish rival, Sir Ernest . South by Ernest Shackleton. As war clouds darkened over Europe in , a party led by Shackleton set out to make t.

And read every moment of the craziest expedition, tragedy, comedy, suffering, hopelessness and then relief. The explorers in this period were amazing. The things they did, lived through, and experienced with little or no more than a "aw shucks" can-do attitude is breathtaking. This story is harrowing, and wonderful. You think you are cold? You think you are hungry? You think maybe you are bored? Read this book, it will blow you away.

That's being Shackleton tough. Jul 01, leslie hamod rated it really liked it. A terrible adventure gone wrong. A compulsive read about explorer Ernest Shackleton and his crew who in attempting to reach th pole, spend years frozen in the ice. What do you think happens to a crew of men, stuck in the perilous icepack, guided by the currents,with a limited supply of food and fuel? Read and find out what a true leader is made of in this true story, written by some of the men who were there and lived to tell the tale!

Another great historical exploration along the same vein as A terrible adventure gone wrong. View all 7 comments.

May 15, Alex rated it it was amazing Shelves: I read this casually, a little at a time. It's one of the great adventure stories of all time, and smashing stuff get it? Like, y'know, "Still stuck on an iceberg. Clear, engaging and often funny. That livens up the doldrum periods - but also, the ef I read this casually, a little at a time. That livens up the doldrum periods - but also, the effect of the long passages in which nothing dramatic happens is that when something does happen, it happens with extraordinary, direct impact.

His account of - minor spoiler, I guess? An incredibly powerful moment. The immediacy of the epistolaryish format, with its you-are-here feel, makes the big moments of the expedition directly heartbreaking. After his account of the main expedition, he starts completely over with what happened with the other boat, the Aurora. You will have forgotten they exist by this time. This is a tough one: I guess I'd suggest laying it aside and picking it up later for this part.

It is much shorter, at least. And it's much shorter even than it looks, because after the story of the Aurora's landing party again, this really is great stuff on its own , Shackleton backtracks again, to the people who stayed on the Aurora, and that part is utterly skippable. I read it so you don't have to. Aug 31, Stacy Lorence rated it it was amazing Shelves: And I don't use the word lightly, considering it is very much an overused word. Ernest Shackleton was a hero not only because of what he endured, but because of how he led.

As opposed to Robert Scott who made a series of errors as well as experiencing some genuine bad luck with inclement weather culminating in disaster in , Shackleton's primary concern above all aspects of his mission were the men under his command. In - on his earlier 'farthest south' expedition Quite simply awesome.

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In - on his earlier 'farthest south' expedition, he turned himself and his men around when within reach of the elusive Pole. He had realised that due to depleted rations and muscles, in the face of extremely adverse weather, if they attained their stated aim of the Pole, they would not return alive.

As it was, he had to be hauled on a sledge for the last slog by his two exhausted team-mates, as he was too weakened to carry on unaided This book tells the almost incredible tale of how his expedition failed early in its stated aims, but ultimately triumphed against a series of truly fearsome circumstances in the most inhospitable place on earth.

Survival on the ice after the crushing destruction of their ship the Endurance, followed by the break-up of the ice and the harrowing escape over the ice floes into the open waters on board the Endurance's 3 lifeboats until the sanctuary of the bleak Elephant Island. Here is where the story begins anew as 'Uncle' Shackleton and 5 men depart for help leaving behind the remaining expedition team on the remote barren island with a protective shelter of 2 upturned lifeboats and a veneer of sealskins, and a diet consisting of pemmican hoosh, ship biscuit, seal blubber and seal meat when that could be hunted If all this hadn't been enough, the rescue party then attempts the crossing of the extreme South Atlantic acknowledged as arguably the most treacherous open sea on the planet in the remainng lifeboat - the James Caird.

All the while Shackleton keeps his men going with his leadership skills and navigational expertise. His fellow rescue party undoubtedly play their part too in performing this miracle of marine adventure. Several hundred miles away their destination - South Georgia - is found.

The journey is not yet over though as Shackleton and 2 others must traverse the unmapped mountainous spine of the island to the relative 'civilisation' of the remote whaling station at Grytviken.